Do only older men suffer from an Enlarged Prostate?

Posted by Alan Cook, September 12 2017

"I thought prostate problems affected the oldies, not people like me, in their 40's. But when the weak flow, urgency and nightly visits to the toilet began, I began to wonder…" This is David's story.

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Topics: BPH, Enlarged Prostate, Lifestyle, Clean Intermittent Catheterisation, Bladder Management, CIC, Urinary Tract Infection, LUTS, Benign Prostate Hyperplasia

What is LUTS?

Posted by Jonathan Simpson, September 8 2017

Sooner or later most men will suffer from urinary problems. That’s no uplifting prognosis… But knowing about the symptoms – and the treatments – will make it less scary. It’s time to learn more about LUTS!

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Topics: BPH, Enlarged Prostate, Lifestyle, Clean Intermittent Catheterisation, Bladder Management, ISC, CIC, Urinary Tract Infection, LUTS, Men's Health, Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms

Top Travel Tips - for a hassle-free holiday

Posted by Sacha Brech, August 30 2017

The Summer holidays may be coming to a close, but it is still a busy time for travelling. The airports and train stations will be clogged up with people, and travellers everywhere will ask themselves: Will I be there in time? Where is the passport? Some of you will also ask yourself: Will I be able to find an accessible toilet? Did I pack enough catheters? Is there anything else I need to consider?

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Topics: Catheterisation, Travelling with Catheters, wheelchair, Lifestyle, Travel, ISC, Self-catheterisation

Living with Spina Bifida...and horses! Part 2 - Evie Toombes

Posted by Jonathan Simpson, August 3 2017

I began training with Millie my horse to prepare for my first para show-jumping competition at Bolesworth International. I was still losing weight but keen to attend. Millie and I finished just outside the placings but had a fantastic show. Shortly after coming home from Bolesworth, I won the Skegness young achievers award which was incredible. I felt so lucky to be recognised and once again it really boosted my confidence to continue what I was doing with my health and horses.

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Topics: Catheterisation, Paralympics, Lifestyle, Recovery, Sport, ISC, spina bifida, Self-catheterisation

Living with Spina Bifida...and horses! Part 1 - Evie Toombes

Posted by Jonathan Simpson, July 21 2017

As a 15 year old girl, living with Lipomyelomeningocele, a form of Spina Bifida which causes weakness as well as bladder and bowel issues, life isn’t easy, but my therapy is horses.  I think it's fair to say that a lot of people with ongoing health issues will face challenges - that's completely normal. But it doesn't mean we should let that get in the way, not at all.

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Topics: Catheterisation, Paralympics, Lifestyle, Recovery, Sport, ISC, spina bifida, Self-catheterisation

Managing my bladder when travelling - Daniel Jenkins

Posted by Jodie Jackson, July 10 2017

I regularly use trains to travel across the UK and some of those journeys can be 3 to 4 hours long. As a wheelchair user, one of the biggest headaches with train travel is getting assistance with getting myself and my luggage onto and off the train.

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Topics: Catheterisation, Travelling with Catheters, wheelchair, Lifestyle, Travel, ISC, Self-catheterisation

Michael Kerr: Adapting to my spinal cord injury - Part 2

Posted by Mike Kerr, June 15 2017

Whilst I was going through rehab, the physio told me about wheelchair rugby, which I thought was a wind up at the start. As I was interested in sport, this was something that really appealed to me. I went along to my first ever wheelchair rugby training session with a team called the Scottish Wildcats. Playing wheelchair rugby helped me regain my independence and allowed me to build up my strength and fitness in an enjoyable way, making everyday tasks easier. It also has a great social side and I have met people who will be my friends forever.

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Topics: Catheterisation, wheelchair, Lifestyle, Recovery, Sport, Spinal Cord Injury, ISC, Self-catheterisation

Michael Kerr: Adapting to my spinal cord injury - Part 1

Posted by Mike Kerr, June 5 2017

Kavos, August 13th 2000, a place and date I will never forget. It was the summer of 2000, I had just finished studying health and fitness at college and had signed up to join the army. I was due to start my basic training in September so I thought I would treat myself to a holiday before the hard work started. My mates and I booked to go to Kavos in Corfu. It was a typical lad's holiday but on the 13th August, only 4 days into the holiday, my life changed forever.

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Topics: Catheterisation, wheelchair, Lifestyle, Recovery, Sport, Spinal Cord Injury, ISC, Self-catheterisation

Passion for dancing: Meet Joel Brown

Posted by Sacha Brech, April 20 2017

Joel’s older brother was driving the car, packed with siblings, returning from a sunny day at the lake when the accident happened. At the age of 9 Joel suffered a spinal cord injury, but it didn’t stop him from making his way to the dance floor.

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Topics: Catheterisation, wheelchair, Lifestyle, Recovery, Sport, Spinal Cord Injury, ISC, Self-catheterisation

Disposable catheters have given me the feeling of being normal again

Posted by Kissinger Deng, April 10 2017

Born in Southern Sudan, injured in Egypt and living in Norway, I have experienced many kinds of medical care. This is my journey to a working bladder routine after suffering a spinal cord injury.

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Topics: Catheterisation, wheelchair, Lifestyle, Spinal Cord Injury, ISC, Self-catheterisation

What’s the best way to ensure quality in urology care?

Posted by Bev Everton, March 29 2017

If you ask the European Association of Urology Nurses (EAUN) they would say: Guidelines. We took the opportunity to talk to Susanne Vahr, Clinical Nurse Specialist at University Hospital of Copenhagen, but also a board member of EAUN, responsible for the EAUN guidelines. 

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Topics: Bladder Management, ISC, Continence, Self-catheterisation, Urology

Exchanging the wheelchair for a Porsche

Posted by Sacha Brech, March 15 2017

There are 10 000 people with a racing license in the UK. 200 of them are women, and one of them has a spinal cord injury. Her name is Nathalie McGloin and today she is at the ACCT symposium in Sweden to share her inspiring story.  For you who will miss it – here is a teaser!

 

“When you’re on a race track with able-bodied drivers, you’re no longer a wheelchair user – you’re another competitor. It’s the freedom you strive for after a spinal cord injury," Nathalie says. "You want to be viewed as a person, not a disabled person.”

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Topics: Lifestyle, Recovery, Spinal Cord Injury, Sports

Pain part 2: Pain Management

Posted by Kent Revedal, February 10 2017

One consequence of a broken spinal cord is loss of bladder and bowel control. 

I saw a Facebook post a few weeks ago, a picture of a woman in some kind of yoga position and the text announced ”Your attitude is your best pain management tool”.

My first reaction was that someone obviously knew nothing about pain. But the more I thought about it, the more it grew on me. As simple as it sounds, it holds a lot of truth... 

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Topics: Lifestyle, Spinal Cord Injury, Continence, MS, Bowel Management, Pain Management

Pain part 1: When the pain doesn't leave

Posted by Kent Revedal, February 1 2017

One consequence of a broken spinal cord is loss of bladder and bowel control. 

”Pain is just weakness leaving your body”. Ever heard that statement? It’s a compelling slogan that the US Marine Corps use in their recruitment ads. It may be an effective recruiting tool, but is it true?

 

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Topics: Lifestyle, Spinal Cord Injury, Continence, MS, Bowel Management, Pain Management

What is BPH and what are the symptoms?

Posted by Wendy Hurn, January 30 2017

Nightly bathroom rounds, leakage or a constant feeling of never having fully emptied the bladder. These are common experience for men, often endured for years, and unfortunately like grey hair – a natural side effect of getting older.

Enlarged prostate, sometimes known as Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), affects nearly half of men over the age of 65 years.

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Topics: BPH, Enlarged Prostate, Lifestyle, Clean Intermittent Catheterisation, Bladder Management, CIC, Urinary Tract Infection, LUTS, Benign Prostate Hyperplasia

Kissinger's Story Part Two

Posted by Kissinger Deng, January 3 2017

In part two of his series, Kissinger Deng, a Paralympian living in Norway, talks about how the challenges and uncertainties he faced after sustaining a spinal chord injury have emboldened his outlook and shaped his attitude.

The white sands of Norway

We arrived on the 15th December at Gardermoen, Norway. We didn’t have winter clothing, and we were convinced that the snow outside was white sand. It was freezing cold - had I made the right choice? Was this going to be a good opportunity for us? We were brought to a reception center in Brøttum. And on the flight to Norway I developed a new pressure ulcer, which I had to treat myself. After 3 months with this ulcer I got admitted to Lillehammer hospital. I was there for about 4-5 months. Coming from Africa, they were afraid that I might carry infectious diseases, so they cleared a whole floor for me at the hospital. Every nurse and doctor who came to look after me was dressed in yellow plastic and had masks covering up their faces. My family stayed in Brøttum and had to get used to this new country by themselves. 

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Topics: Paralympics, Lifestyle, Recovery, Travel, Spinal Cord Injury, Sports

What's the difference between Enlarged Prostate (BPH) and Prostate Cancer?

Posted by Sacha Brech, December 22 2016

Many people think that an enlarged prostate (BPH) and prostate cancer are associated, but the simple answer is: No, they are not.

Professor Ralph Peeker explains the concepts.

With age, most men’s prostates grow. But an enlarged prostate (BPH) has nothing to do with cancer.

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Topics: BPH, Enlarged Prostate, Continence

Kissinger's Story Part One

Posted by Kissinger Deng, December 15 2016

In the first of a two part series, Kissinger Deng, a Paralympian living in Norway, recalls the events that led to his injury, and his difficult journey towards recovery. It's been far from easy, but there have been many  triumphs along the way and Kissinger is happy to share his whole story with you.

Living the dream

I was born in 1979, in Sudan. My family are a part of the Dinka tribe. When I was nine years old we fled to Egypt to escape the conflict in my own country. I took up basketball there at twelve years old, and it quickly became my biggest passion, and I pursued my goal of playing in the NBA with absolute focus. I ate slept and dreamt basketball. At fifteen I played my first match as a professional. I was making fast progress on my way to achieving my dream as my team progressed through a tournament. Later that summer we made it to the finals for the under 17s. This was going to be a big match and I thought to myself - could this be the game that was going to take me and my family out of Egypt?

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Topics: Paralympics, Lifestyle, Recovery, Spinal Cord Injury, Sports

Travel tips: spread your wings and fly with me!

Posted by Kissinger Deng, December 8 2016

Having suffered a SCI at age 16, Kissinger Deng knows the pitfalls involved in flying as a wheel chair user. A Paralympian, he flies often as the goal keeper for the Oslo Sledge Hockey team. Here he shares his tips for a hassle-free travel experience.

I travel a lot; with the hockey team and on holidays. A lot of people I speak with assume that traveling with a wheelchair is a stressful undertaking, but it really doesn’t have to be. With a lot of flying done, both alone and in company, I have accumulated quite a bit of experience. These trips weren’t only positive but enabled me to expand my knowledge of stress-free travelling :)

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Topics: Lifestyle, Travel, Sport, Spinal Cord Injury

Taking charge of your life, Part 2

Posted by Anna Westberg, December 5 2016

There are always positives to be found among the downsides. If the disease or diagnosis, and the various associated matters weigh heavily, it helps to look for all the positive things in life that weigh against this. To achieve that balance, a caregiver needs to be prepared to talk, ask questions and not serve answers like an automaton.

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Topics: Lifestyle, Recovery, Coping Strategies